Remove A Fixed Sprocket

Introduction

A fixed gear bike has a single fixed sprocket screwed onto a thread on the back wheel. The power of the drive screws the sprocket on tighter.

Step 1

<h3>Step 1</h3><p>A hub dedicated for fixed gear use has two threads the inner thread has a larger diameter. The fixed sprocket screws on here on a standard right-hand thread. The outer thread has a smaller diameter a lock-ring screws on here on a left-hand thread. A hub with only one thread can be used with a fixed sprocket but the wheel can’t be used as a foot brake. The sprocket may unscrew under the force of braking.</p>
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Lock-ring Thread

A hub dedicated for fixed gear use has two threads the inner thread has a larger diameter. The fixed sprocket screws on here on a standard right-hand thread. The outer thread has a smaller diameter a lock-ring screws on here on a left-hand thread. A hub with only one thread can be used with a fixed sprocket but the wheel can’t be used as a foot brake. The sprocket may unscrew under the force of braking.

Step 2

<h3>Step 2</h3><p>Use a lock-ring spanner to unscrew the lock-ring by turning it clockwise.
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Unscrew The Lock-ring

Use a lock-ring spanner to unscrew the lock-ring by turning it clockwise.

Step 3

<h3>Step 3</h3><p>Use a chain-whip to grip the fixed sprocket. Turn the fixed sprocket anti-clockwise to unscrew it. It may be wound on tight and require plenty of force to start it moving.</p>
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Unscrew The Fixed Sprocket

Use a chain-whip to grip the fixed sprocket. Turn the fixed sprocket anti-clockwise to unscrew it. It may be wound on tight and require plenty of force to start it moving.